George Carlin, Billy Joel and Phish guitarist Trey Anastasio will be the first three interviews featured in “The Tapes Archive,” a new podcast from Osiris that unearths never before heard conversations with musicians and comedians.

The first episodes will be released the week of August 22, with new episodes every Wednesday.

The podcast is a collaboration between documentary filmmaker Alan Berry (“Dead Man’s Line”) and his longtime friend, journalist Marc Allan, who conducted and recorded the interviews decades ago. Allan recorded these interviews via phone, and the podcast provides a unique, intimate look into music, culture and these artists’ careers at specific moments in time. Most interviews were conducted between 1985-1995.

“Marc has had these tapes locked away for years,” Berry said. “We thought that there would be fans who want to hear these conversations, and the podcast took off from there.”

Berry and Allan curated a 12-episode season that will include interviews with Neil Peart of Rush, Frank Zappa, Ray Charles, Joan Rivers and more.

“All the interviews are authentic, thought provoking, personal,” Osiris CEO RJ Bee said. “The rapport and laughter between Marc and the artist adds a lot of intimacy. This is really a gold mine that they have unearthed. These interviews are like little moments in history that would have otherwise been lost. I can’t wait for people to hear them.”

The interviews contain revealing, candid conversations. Some notable quotes from the first three episodes:

  • George Carlin on Donald Trump in 1989: “A real rat. It would be nice to see him run over by a truck. But he makes my life interesting.”
  • Billy Joel on whether he was confident about his success in 1994: “Lots of people forget: I started out at the bottom and I spent most of my life without money. Most of my life I was poor. And I had doubts that I would be able, because I had other jobs when I was a musician. I was a painter and a landscaper, and I worked in a gas station, short-order cook. I even wrote rock criticism. These were always like day gigs, which would augment the money I was making in the night gig. Like I said, when I realized I could pay the rent and have money left over for food from being a musician, that was one of the highlights of my life.”
  • Trey Anastasio, on working “without a net” musically, in 1993: “If you get tense about it, you’re gonna run into problems and if you just kind of let go of yourself and whatever your fears and ego and that kind of thing and get up on stage and just enjoy the experience of playing music, which was the reason that we all got into this in the first place, if you can maintain that, then it’s amazing how much fun it is. And if you’re having fun, that’s what’s translating out to the audience. If you’re worried about proving something, inevitably you’re kind of gonna fail, I think.”

Each episode will be released with a written transcript, articles that Allan wrote based on the interviews, and new blog posts about each interview.

Visit The Tapes Archive to learn more about the podcast, and subscribe via Apple Podcasts and Spotify. And check out the YouTube page for videos for each episode.

%d bloggers like this: